If you build it, will they come? How events like MFG Day could be the key to overcoming the talent crisis in manufacturing

No imageBy Ben Dollar

With the majority of 2016 Manufacturing Day events kicking off October 7th, companies are reflecting on talent strategies that could potentially revitalize and protect the future of manufacturing. And, taking part in this growing initiative can help manufacturers in their pursuit to overcome talent challenges. Want to understand how being a part of Manufacturing Day can really help change perceptions? Host or attend a MFG Day event and be sure to invite your participants to take part in a post-event survey, created by the Manufacturing Day producers and Deloitte, to see the impact you and the industry are having on changing perceptions. You can also access tools to promote participation by using the host toolkit.

Continue reading “If you build it, will they come? How events like MFG Day could be the key to overcoming the talent crisis in manufacturing”

Innovation drives competitiveness. But what drives innovation?

Posted by Michelle Drew Rodriguez

Research1 shows advanced manufacturing is more essential than ever to economic competitiveness and prosperity. But what is involved in driving, sustaining, and applying the innovation that makes a company or country a leader in advanced manufacturing? In this post, I’ll explore the drivers that make the US a leader in innovation. Research and development (R&D) certainly plays a role, but the real key may be an intangible one: the innovation ecosystem.

Continue reading “Innovation drives competitiveness. But what drives innovation?”

The challenges of quality control in additive manufacturing

The challenges of quality control in additive manufacturingPosted by Bharat Parihar

I recently attended the Additive Manufacturing in Defense Forum organized by Deloitte Consulting LLP, where participant Paul Boulware, an EWI applications engineer of drove home one particular point: “To make one-inch cube of metal, it takes five miles of weld and half a day. As you are building these parts, knowing the quality of the part is crucial. You cannot wait to know that there is a problem in layer five or six or seven, after the part is built” [and therefore fail your quality control tests].

Continue reading “The challenges of quality control in additive manufacturing”

Supercharging the Supply Chain with the Digital Thread for Additive Manufacturing

Supercharging the Supply Chain with the Digital Thread for Additive ManufacturingPosted by Mauricio Castro

Many companies want to adopt additive manufacturing (AM) technologies into their supply chain, but an essential link is missing: the “digital thread.” Jim Joyce, federal specialist leader in Deloitte Consulting LLP’s Strategy & Operations consulting practice, says the digital thread could elevate 3D printing from a consumer curiosity to a supply chain supercharger that will potentially change the way products are made.

Continue reading “Supercharging the Supply Chain with the Digital Thread for Additive Manufacturing”

The emerging additive manufacturing path in the Defense industry: How organizations can bring 3d printing into the mainstream

The emerging additive manufacturing path in the Defense industryPosted by Grant White

In the past decade, Additive Manufacturing (AM) has experienced a meteoric rise in both its technological capability and the resulting public fascination with seemingly endless applications. Everything from web browsing, to corporate investment strategy, to government policy discussion has been touched with potential intention and excitement over the potential benefits of AM going mainstream. Evidence of this can be seen in the approximately 300 percent increase in the valuation of the global 3D Printing industry since 20112 (growing from $1.7B to over $5.1B in 2015), as well as in the six-fold increase in the popularity of “3D Printing” searches1 executed on the internet (relative to total queries over this same period). Sadly though, mere intentions don’t build anything. Even with the improved levels of product quality and printing materials, the mass application and adoption of AM in traditional manufacturing and distribution networks simply hasn’t yet taken place, much to the frustration of AM disciples.

Continue reading “The emerging additive manufacturing path in the Defense industry: How organizations can bring 3d printing into the mainstream”

2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index examines how global manufacturing companies can succeed

Posted by Michelle Drew Rodriguez

In the first two blog posts about the 2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index, I discussed country rankings and global competitiveness drivers uncovered in the Index which I coauthored with several colleagues at Deloitte (including Craig Giffi, Vice Chairman, US Automotive Leader and Tim Hanley, Global Manufacturing Leader) and in collaboration with the US Council on Competitiveness. The study follows earlier versions released in 2010 and 2013, and the findings are based on an in-depth analysis of survey responses from more than 500 chief executive officers and senior leaders at manufacturing companies around the world.

As a follow up to the posts on rankings and competitiveness drivers identified in the study, I also wanted to take a deeper look at how global manufacturing companies can succeed, which you can learn more about in the full study.

Five tips for global manufacturing success

Here are five key insights from the report that manufacturing executives should consider to position their companies for future competitiveness:

  • Ensure talent is “the” top priority: A focus on creating differentiated talent acquisition, development and retention strategies to be regarded as “employers of choice,” as well as identifying and nurturing new models of collaboration that leverage key sources of talent outside of the organization will be key. As talent is ranked as the most important driver of competitiveness by executives around the world, the competition among nations and companies is expected to be fierce.
  • Embrace advanced technologies to drive competitive advantage: Advanced technologies are increasingly underpinning global manufacturing competitiveness. Leading 21st century manufacturers have fully converged the digital and physical worlds where advanced hardware combined with advanced software, sensors, and massive amounts of data and analytics is expected to result in smarter products, processes, and more closely connected customers, suppliers, and manufacturing. Predictive analytics, the Internet-of-Things (IoT), both smart products and smart factories via Industry 4.0, as well as the development and use of advanced materials will be critical to future competitiveness.
  • Leverage strengths of ecosystem partnerships beyond traditional boundaries: Adoption of innovation strategies aimed at embracing a broader ecosystem approach, developing and taking advantage of integrated manufacturing and technology clusters and partners, will be a growing imperative going forward. Competitiveness will be directly correlated to the strength and robustness of an organization’s collaborative networks and eco-systems.
  • Develop a balanced approach across the global enterprise: Increasingly sophisticated tools and strategies will be required to optimize the global manufacturing enterprise from a talent, technology, operational, financial, tax and regulatory perspective. The core of this approach is achieving a successful balance across a variety of drivers, including talent management, innovation portfolio, cost competitiveness, manufacturing footprint and supply chain in challenging and rapidly evolving new markets. Indeed, both leading companies and countries are taking a more balanced approach by building a foundation for growth across multiple drivers of global competitiveness.
  • Cultivate smart, strategic public private partnerships: Governments are becoming increasingly aware of the significant benefits a manufacturing industry provides to national economic prosperity. Likewise, manufacturing companies are keenly aware of the role government policy can play in their success. Therefore, many nations with unfavorable or overly bureaucratic manufacturing policies are working to improve and reform those, invest in greater economic development, and strengthen overall manufacturing infrastructure, while seeking to partner in more productive ways with businesses. Leading companies, in turn, are targeting new, smart and strategic public/private partnership models to help drive improvements not possible alone, resulting in non-traditional business-public sector alignments as the global competitive playing field undergoes a significant transformation at both the company and country level.

In summary, our full study offers a critical and timely jumping-off point for companies and economies as they make strategic investments in advanced manufacturing technologies and enact public policies designed to spur post-industrial era manufacturing growth. We hope, both government heads and company CEOs adopt key takeaways from this study to reshape the future of manufacturing.

Be sure to visit our GMCI Interactive Website to drill down into additional findings.

 

If you didn’t have an opportunity to view the first two post in the three part series, please be sure click the following links to read about additional findings from the Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index study: competitiveness rankings and drivers of manufacturing competitiveness.

Join the conversation on @DeloitteMFG #GMCI16

2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index examines key drivers of competitiveness

Posted by Michelle Drew Rodriguez

In the first blog post I recently wrote about the 2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index, which I coauthored with several colleagues at Deloitte (including Craig Giffi, Vice Chairman, US Automotive Leader and Tim Hanley, Global Manufacturing Leader) and in collaboration with the US Council on Competitiveness, I primarily discussed country rankings revealed in the Index. The study is modeled from earlier versions we released in 2010 and 2013, and the findings are based on an in-depth analysis of survey responses from more than 500 chief executive officers and senior leaders at manufacturing companies around the world. A number of interesting findings arose this year.

Continue reading “2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index examines key drivers of competitiveness”

US manufacturing competitiveness rising, set to take no. 1 spot from China by 2020

Posted by Michelle Drew Rodriguez

In a study I recently coauthored with several colleagues (including Craig Giffi, Vice Chairman, US Automotive Leader and Tim Hanley, Global Manufacturing Leader) and in collaboration with the US Council on Competitiveness, executives indicated the United States is expected to be the most competitive manufacturing nation, moving China into the number two position by 2020. The study-2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index-by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (Deloitte Global) and the Council on Competitiveness (Council)-follows earlier studies we released in 2010 and 2013. This year’s rankings are based on an in-depth analysis of survey responses from more than 500 chief executive officers and senior leaders at manufacturing companies around the world, and a number of interesting findings arose.

Continue reading “US manufacturing competitiveness rising, set to take no. 1 spot from China by 2020”